Q
Evaluate Weigh the pros and cons of technologies, products and projects you are considering.

How can I convince my boss a tool is worth investing in on a hunch?

It's easy to get the owner of my small business to buy IT if there's a defined need for it -- antivirus, auditing tools, whatever. What about the stuff that I'd like to try out but can't identify an immediate, near-term or probable need for? I'm referring to things I have a gut feeling that I'd find it useful if I could just get hold of it for longer than an evaluation period that I'd probably miss anyway. The latest example was VMWare Workstation. I have a feeling that multiple virtual PCs will allow me to be more productive, but I can't wave that under my manager's nose.

It's easy to get the owner of my small business to buy IT if there's a defined need for it -- antivirus, auditing tools, whatever. What about the stuff that I'd like to try out but can't identify an immediate, near-term or probable need for? I'm referring to things I have a gut feeling that I'd find it useful if I could just get hold of it for longer than an evaluation period that I'd probably miss anyway. The latest example was VMWare Workstation. I have a feeling that multiple virtual PCs will allow me to be more productive, but I can't wave that under my manager's nose.
Any solution worth investing in will typically help the business drive revenue, improve productivity or save money. The key to any initiative you want others to consider for approval is to verify the benefits and then document the value of the solution compared to its costs to the organization. A simple business case would consist of the following topics covered to provide the executive with the business criteria they need to make sure the decision is well-founded and can deliver value.
  1. Purpose of project -- name of project and the scope of coverage; users who would use the project

     

  2. Business goal -- such as improving productivity of particular users or groups

     

  3. Benefits of project

     

    • Improve productivity -- how many hours it can save in a day; multiply the number of users who can benefit from it by the burdened user rate to quantify the productivity gain in dollars and cents.
    • Reduced/avoided costs -- how much current costs such as support and service fees or future costs such as anticipated system upgrades or purchases can be avoided with the proposed solution
    • Additional revenue opportunities -- additional customers, increased transaction price, increased number of transactions that the solution can generate

     

  4. Costs of project

     

    • Costs for hardware and software Ongoing maintenance and support costs
    • Training costs

     

  5. ROI calculation -- over a typical three-year period, the ratio of net benefits (calculated as total benefits less total costs) divided by total costs, expressed as a percentage

     

  6. Additional intangible (non-quantifiable strategic) benefits of implementing the solution

     

  7. Risks, if any, of implementing the project -- including chances for cost or schedule overruns or not realizing key benefits such as poor adoption
A simple one-page report highlighting these elements will provide the ammunition you need to verify the benefits to the company and obtain approval.
This was last published in December 2005

Dig Deeper on VMware desktop software and desktop virtualization

Have a question for an expert?

Please add a title for your question

Get answers from a TechTarget expert on whatever's puzzling you.

You will be able to add details on the next page.

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchServerVirtualization

SearchVirtualDesktop

SearchDataCenter

SearchCloudComputing

Close